Executive Orders: 13175: Public Law: 97 280 96

Report All Crimes!

  1. Announcement of U.S. Support :for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Initiatives to Promote the Government-to-Government Relationship & Improve the Lives of Indigenous Peoples today, in response to the many calls from indigenous Aka Native Americans throughout this country and in order to further U.S. policy on indigenous issues, President Obama announced that the United States has changed its position. on July 29, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA). This comprehensive bill is aimed at improving public safety on tribal lands. The statute gives tribes greater authority to prosecute crimes and increases federal accountability for public safety
  2. UNITED NATIONS:Convinced that the recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples in this Declaration will enhance harmonious and cooperative relations between the State and indigenous peoples, based on principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, non-discrimination and good faith, Encouraging States to comply with and effectively implement all their obligations as they apply to indigenous peoples under international instruments, in particular those related to human rights, in consultation and cooperation with the peoples concerned, Emphasizing that the United Nations has an important and continuing role to play in promoting and protecting the rights of indigenous peoples, See resolution 2200 A (XXI), annex. 3.A/CONF.157/24 (Part I), chap. III
  3. 2.DOJ Department Of Justice:The statute gives tribes greater authority to prosecute crimes and increases federal accountability for public safety in tribal communities. In conformity with the TLOA, the Attorney General established the Office of Tribal Justice as a separate component within the organizational structure of the Department of Justice. The Office has played, and will continue to play, a key role in DOJ’s ongoing initiative to improve public safety in Indian Country, and it serves as the primary channel for tribes to communicate their concerns to the Department, helps coordinate policy on Indian affairs both within DOJ and with other federal agencies, and seeks to ensure that DOJ and its components work with tribes on a government-to-government basis. The Departments of the Interior, Justice, and Health and Human Services are engaged in an unprecedented effort to consult with tribes to develop policy and implement this new law.
    In response to tribal input, DOJ has also streamlined its grant-making process. The Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) combines ten different grant programs into a single solicitation. In September 2010, hundreds of American Indian and Alaska Native communities received the first grants under CTAS – to enhance law enforcement, bolster justice systems, prevent youth substance abuse, serve sexual assault and elder abuse victims, and support other tribal efforts to combat crime.
    Opening Statement on Tribal Lives Matters 2:

    Tribal self-determination has enabled tribal governments to establish, develop, and enhance tribal institutions and infrastructure ranging from those addressing the health, education, and welfare of their communities to those such as tribal courts, fire protection, and law enforcement. The clear lesson is that empowering tribes to deal with the challenges they face and that taking advantage of the available opportunities will result in tribal communities that thrive.

  4. UN LAW Article 37 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the recognition, observance and enforcement of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements concluded with States or their successors and to have States honor and respect such treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements. 2. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as diminishing or eliminating the rights of indigenous peoples contained in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
  5. UN LAW Article 38: States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples and tribal Community leaders, shall take the appropriate measures, including legislative measures, to achieve the ends of this Declaration.
  6. UN Law Article 18: Indigenous peoples have the right to participate in decision-making in matters which would affect their rights, through representatives chosen by themselves in accordance with their own procedures, as well as to maintain and develop their own indigenous decision- making institutions.
  7. UN LAW Article 13: 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings.
  1. DOJ’s is deeply committed to strengthening tribal police and judicial systems.The Department of Justice (DOJ), for example, is deeply committed to strengthening tribal police and judicial systems. Accordingly, the President’s FY 2011 to DOJ for tribal public safety initiatives, an increase of 42% over FY 2010. This includes grants to Indian tribes for tribal law enforcement efforts to investigate violent crimes in Indian Country.These increases build on Reinvestment and Recovery Act (Recovery Act) funds made available to tribes in FY 2009 to address criminal justice needs. In addition, on July 29, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA). This comprehensive bill is aimed at improving public safety on tribal lands. (The AMERICAN DRIPS LAW ARTICLE: EO: AG/DEC. 79 (XLIV-O/14)
    The United States remains committed to addressing the urgent issues of concern to indigenous peoples across the Americas, including combating societal discrimination against indigenous peoples.) EXECUTIVE ORDERS: AG/DEC. 79 (XLIV-O/14)
    The United States is therefore pleased to support the Declaration’s call to promote the development of a new and distinct international concept of self-determination specific to indigenous peoples. The Declaration’s call is to promote the development of a concept of self determination for indigenous peoples that is different from the existing right of self determination in international law. The purpose of the Declaration was not to change or define the existing right of self-determination under international law.
    Further, as explained in Article 46, the Declaration does not imply any right to take any action that would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.
    For the United States, the Declaration’s concept of self-determination is consistent with the United States’ existing recognition of, and relationship with, federally recognized tribes as political entities that have inherent sovereign powers of self-governance.
    This recognition is the basis for the special legal and political relationship, including the government-to-government relationship, established between the United States and recognized tribes, pursuant to which the United States supports, protects, and promotes tribal governmental authority over a broad range of internal and territorial affairs, including membership, culture, language, religion, education, information, social welfare, community and public safety, family relations, economic activities, lands and resource management, environment and entry by non-members, as well as ways and means for financing these autonomous governmental functions.
    Federal agencies are engaged in a wide range of activities to enhance tribal self determination in areas crucial to the well-being of tribal members.
    The Department of Justice (DOJ), for example, is deeply committed to strengthening tribal police and judicial systems. Accordingly, the President’s Executive Orders:
    US LAW Article 39
    Indigenous peoples have the right to have access to financial and technical assistance from States and through international cooperation, for the enjoyment of the rights contained in this Declaration.

    UN LAW Article 40

    Indigenous peoples have the right to access to and prompt decision through just and fair procedures for the resolution of conflicts and disputes with States or other parties, as well as to effective remedies for all infringements of their individual and collective rights. Such a decision shall give due consideration to the customs, traditions, rules and legal systems of the indigenous peoples concerned and international human rights.

Please have your agency or business review the entire UNITED NATIONS DRIPS LAWS AND COUNSULT WITH THEIR REPRESETVIVES UN/US DRIPS LAW ARTICLES.
All Rights Reserved.
Executive Orders ADJ: Public Law: 97-280-96

Advertise Yah Business/Events here!

Place Your Ads Here!
Contact us: 916-750-4192
Just $7 A Month No Hidden Fees.

Click Here For Guidelines and info.

Report A Crime?

About ⱯエヨƵⱯ・ヨƵオⱯ (Sr. Chief Executive City Council) 46 Articles
Power in the hand of strength in worship of Ahyaha.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply